How To Write In Spanish – 4 Tips To Ace Your Spanish Writing

Escribir En Español: 4 Trucos Para No Equivocarte - iScribo
Spanish writing shouldn’t be a challenge in your learning. If you wonder how to write in Spanish free of mistakes, learn these tips and build your confidence.

You may be scared of learning how to write in Spanish since you’ve undoubtedly blushed, sweated, scratched your head, or shed tears when learning the fundamentals of the language.

Writing in Spanish is enjoyable, and believe it or not, a little amount of regular writing practice can significantly accelerate your learning progress.

Contrary to popular belief, most individuals find learning how to write in Spanish to be a relief. When compared to other languages, it isn’t that dissimilar to writing in English, and many aspects are substantially simpler to grasp.

Here are 4 tips to get you started quickly on the correct route to Spanish writing in no time.

1. Begin with Spelling

If English is your first language, you’re in good company when it comes to spelling, since learning to spell in English is a mystery.

Why do the words “cough,” “through,” and “dough” not rhyme? Why do we have so many double letters, and why do vowels sound so different?

Fortunately, spelling in Spanish is much more straightforward than spelling in English.

This may seem too good to be true, but written words in Spanish are meant to resemble how they sound! There are many fewer instances of silent letters, duplicate letters, or spellings for the same sounds.

Also, no matter what other letters are around it, each vowel has its distinct sound.

There are several resources to assist you with your Spanish study, whether you are a total novice or not.

iScribo assists in your Spanish writing in real-time. It will assist you with syntax, grammar, spelling, and sentence formation to name a few.

2. Work on Your Grammar

In English, you can’t speak one word out of place in a phrase without someone noticing and may be referring to you as Yoda. Even though it is valid grammar, we must accept that we have a pretty rigid syntax for what is deemed standard in contemporary English.

In this regard, Spanish is a friendlier language. In phrases, at least two or three orders are normally regarded as appropriate.

When it comes to grammar, things that worry us in English are made a lot easier in Spanish. Word order, punctuation, and capitalisation are significantly simpler to master.

Of course, there’s still a lot to learn, as well as certain issues that aren’t covered in English, such as gender. There’s a lot to learn about verb tenses, irregularities, and mood.

It won’t be difficult to get started with the correct resources and a little assistance. There are several methods for studying the fundamentals of Spanish grammar. Picking up or borrowing a textbook is one of the simplest, cheapest, and most effective methods to get started.

And once you have a good grasp of Grammar you can use iScribo to double-check if your Spanish grammar is correct or not.

3. Capitalise

Capitalisation is another source of comfort in Spanish.

At times, capitalising words in English may be both excessive and misleading. We continually must judge if something is suitable or not to determine whether it is worthy of a capital letter.

Capitalising in Spanish is a lot easier. For starters, the following words are not capitalised in Spanish as they are in English: Weekdays, months, religions, languages, and nationalities. All of them are preserved in lowercase.

In other circumstances, such as titles, just a little amount of capitalisation is employed. When writing down a movie or book title, just the first word of the title is capitalised, while every subsequent word is left lowercase.

Another situation in which just partial capitalisation is used is when referring to a proper noun. Only the particular name is capitalised, with the remainder of the title remaining in lowercase. Mount Everest, for example, would be monte Everest in Spanish.

4. Master the Punctuation

While it isn’t very harsh, there is a little variation in how we punctuate sentences in English and Spanish.

The inclusion of upside-down question marks and exclamation points is the most visible alteration. When asking a question in Spanish, it must begin with an upside-down question mark. As an example:

¿Qué hora es? (What time is it?)

Exclamatory sentences follow the same logic. As an example:

¡Dios mío! (My God!)

The Bottom Line

While certain aspects of the language may be difficult to grasp, Spanish writing is not that difficult.

With these considerations in mind, try to write in Spanish and attempt to include some reading into your daily life. It’s as simple as turning on your TV’s Spanish subtitles or picking up a Spanish magazine. Continue your studies and ¡buena suerte!

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